WordPress meet-up, December 2017

Siddharth has been organizing WordPress meet-ups in Goa for the last three years. Unfortunately, I am often not in the city to attend them. So, this time, to ensure that I am there, I offered to help him organize it.

Both of us have recently joined a co-working place, 91Springboard, and they offered to host the event. Hampus made us a logo, complete with coconut trees, a Portuguese style house, and a fish thali! Sid wanted circular transparent stickers which we got printed from Midway.

Along with the informal meeting, we decided to have two short talks. The first by Abhishek about Open Source, and the second by me about Gutenberg. This was really an excuse for me to explore WordPress’ new editor.

On the day of the meet-up, we were a bit disappointed with the turnout. Of the 40 people who RSVP’d on meetup.com, only 15 came. We started the talks at 6:15 pm and in an hour both were done. What followed was a lively discussion about the future of WordPress, the nuances of theme licensing, and the standard of government websites. Later, everyone went to Joseph’s to get a drink, but I got sleepy soon after and left for home. What had started with disappointment turned into the realization that the people who did come were the perfect ones.

WordPress Goa, Prateek talking

For next time, we need to remember to start a little late, 5:00 pm on a Friday is too early. We also need to try and get the word out to students. If you would like to attend, talk, or have any suggestions, do get in touch.

On Writing Well

A half read ebook doesn’t clutter your bedside table. Instead, it buries itself under an icon. A 42-by-42px icon, of an obscure app, on a broken phone, which will never be taken for repair.

Fortunately, my copy of On Writing Well by William Zinsser escaped this fate. I was reminded that I was reading it while scrolling through old blog posts. I was also reminded that I used to blog about books. These reminders ended my search for an open, sync-able, and cross-platform annotation solution. I have struggled to accept WhisperSync and struggled to implement OpenAnnotations, I just want a simple and easy alternative.

So, for now, I will have a single blog post for a book, with all highlights, and notes, using the Web Annotations markup standards. I didn’t make notes while reading this book so these are my highlights:

Unity is the anchor of good writing. So, first, get your unities straight…unity of pronoun…unity of tense…unity of mood…

I don’t like plurals; they weaken writing because they are less specific than the singular, less easy to visualize.

The above quote was in the particular context of gendered pronouns (he/she/they), but I am noting it as general advice.

We are a culture that worships the winning result: the league championship, the high test score. Coaches are paid to win, teachers are valued for getting students into the best colleges. Less glamorous gains made along the way—learning, wisdom, growth, confidence, dealing with failure—aren’t given the same respect because they can’t be given a grade.

All your clear and pleasing sentences will fall apart if you don’t keep remembering that writing is linear and sequential, that logic is the glue that holds it together, that tension must be maintained from one sentence to the next and from one paragraph to the next and from one section to the next, and that narrative—good old-fashioned storytelling—is what should pull your readers along without their noticing the tug. The only thing they should notice is that you have made a sensible plan for your journey.

I ask myself one very helpful question: “What is the piece really about?” (Not just “What is the piece about?”)

When we say we like the style of certain writers, what we mean is that we like their personality as they express it on paper.

We know that verbs have more vigor than nouns, that active verbs are better than passive verbs, that short words and sentences are easier to read than long ones, that concrete details are easier to process that vague abstractions.

Organizing Wikidata WikiProjects

TL;DR: Notes on how I’ve been organizing pages for my Wikidata WikiProjects. These are for my future self but could benefit others too. Suggestions welcome!

NOTE: This is about topic related projects, community WikiProjects like WikiProject India would have different needs.

In the last six months, I have created three Wikidata Wikiprojects with different sizes, depth, and completeness. After rounds of trial and error, I have learned of useful Templates and ways of organizing these pages. Having a good WikiProject page is like having good code documentation, it helps me remember what I wanted to do even when I come back after a month of being inactive. Here are my building blocks:

Introduction

Explain the domain of the project using the P and Q templates. If there are sub-pages with tables (more on this later) I try to list them here, but I am not yet sure if this is a good idea. See the intro section of the CJI project for an example.

Queries

Hoping the reader scrolls at least to the second section, I put up queries and visualizations to create some interest. Using the SPARQL template I show the main query of the project, collecting all the entities of the project’s domain. I use Cot and Cob for all subsequent queries so that they don’t take up too much vertical space.

I try to set an interesting defaultView for the queries so that people can visualize the data, but I haven’t used images, screenshots, or interactive charts yet. Those would surely get more attention, but images will go out of date, and I still haven’t learned Vega. Should explore SparqlCharts too.

Properties

While the first two sections are for people visiting your project, the next sections are for those doing the work. The properties section should define all the details you want to add to the entities. If there are too many, you might want to break them down to Core and Extras to ease the workload.

It took me a while to learn and understand the features of List of Properties/Row. Customize the table using description, example-subject, example-property arguments. I used the contextualized-qualifier for the first time in the core properties of the CJI project.

Data table and sub-page

A table of all the entities and properties of the project is useful in doing and monitoring the work. I prefer to keep it on a sub-page as its usually too large for the project page. See Delhi Metro/Stations for an example.

The Wikidata list template gives you a table based on a SPARQL query that gets updated by a bot every day. This has been very helpful for me, I watchlist the page with this table and I get an update if any property of any object that I care about has changed, whether or not it was direct, and whether or not that object itself is on my watchlist. The template also lets you see labels in multiple languages, but unfortunately not descriptions.

Resources, scratchpad & questions

At the end, I have miscellaneous sections to document helpful resources, questions, ideas, or anything else that doesn’t have a place. Often bullet points here become properties to be added, or citations used on the objects.


In the case of WikiProject Delhi Metro, which is the largest WikiProject out of the three I also have a section to help get contributors started, and a userbox too.

For both Delhi Metro and ISRO I have sections for broad topics like launch vehicles or stations, and sections for queries, properties, and resources within them.

He came by bus from Margao,
no he isn’t from Margao.
Someone on a bike
dropped him from Quepem.

He came by bus from Margao.
Just for this?
When I was younger,
maybe I would have too.

He came by bus from Margao,
I dropped him to Porvorim.
Someone on a bike
came to pick him up.

He said his aunt used to live
near where I live now.

When she was working, she would doodle on sheets of paper and scribble formulas on the edges of her drawings, leading her daughter to describe the work as painting, the Stanford statement said.

Mirzakhani once described her work as “like being lost in a jungle and trying to use all the knowledge that you can gather to come up with some new tricks, and with some luck you might find a way out”.

🔖Maryam Mirzakhani, first woman to win mathematics’ Fields medal, dies at 40