MediaWiki API errors in FileAnnotations

I am working on FileAnnotations’ error handling. When I started writing the patch I wasn’t aware of all the cases we’ll have to tackle, Mark was nice enough to guide. Below is a list of errors that could occur and how to handle them.

AbuseFilter
AbuseFilter does not reject the mw.Api promise, but returns an object that has a warning.

Use the abusefilter-disallowed message here.

No edit permission
This one rejects the promise and the function has the error code as a string and an object literal that has details. It has the same object again as the third argument, I wonder what that is about.

Should probably not show the add annotation interface if the user does not have permissions in the first place. In case we do, use the permissionserror message from core.

Session expired
Tested a few cases for this. If the user is logged out in the middle of adding an annotation they’d get a permissiondenied error. But if one logs out and logs into a different account in another tab, the new edit is correctly attributed to the newly logged in account.

Unreachable server
I found the api-error-http error message but haven’t been able to figure out how or when it triggers. Have filed a separate task for now.

Block
This rejects the promise with error messages too. Could show api-error-blocked here, but it doesn’t show some of the useful information that is returned.

Protected page
Should protecting a File page automatically protect the Annotations page too? This is the same as some of the other errors, and core already has a protectedpage message.

Looking at all the api-error-* messages in core, these might show up too.

  • autoblock
  • badtoken
  • http (timeout error?)
  • timeout
  • unclassified

Here is the updated patch.

Rhythm of prime numbers

I had been reading about music theory on Wikipedia and was fascinated with the amount of mathematics involved in it. After going into the rabbit hole of the circle of fifths, the duodecimal number system, and this crazy clock face, I finally decided to go to bed. Having read so much (and understood so little), I started to wonder where prime numbers fit in.

As I understand rhythm better than harmony and melody, I decided to map the first few prime numbers to a beat. Since most prime numbers below fifty are either one more, or one less than a multiple of six, I knew it’ll lead to interesting results.

Rock

The rock beat has a hi-hat on every eighth note, and I am counting every eighth note for mapping the prime numbers. There is a snare and the bass drum on 1 and 3, and 2 and 4 respectively to make a basic rock beat, a clap for every prime number, and a cow bell for multiples of six.


The accentuation is on the 6th eighth note of the first bar, the 4th eighth note of the second bar and so on, because of prime numbers lying adjacent to multiples of six. I feel this gives the beat some swing.

Jazz

Because of Jazz’s triplet beat structure, it lends itself better to multiples of six. I counted every triplet to map the prime numbers. Its the most basic jazz beat with the low tom playing for prime numbers.


Both beats sound alright and not as random as prime numbers are, mostly because we stuck to those below fifty. If you want to count along with the beat, here are slowed down versions of both:



The band Tool is known to have used the Fibonacci sequence in Lateralus, I wonder if they or someone else used prime numbers too.